United’s New Uniforms for Merged Carrier Live Today – Boring & Bland…

Select United employees began wearing their new uniforms today and a collective yawn was heard throughout Chicago, Houston, Newark, and LA. It looks like they combined the legacy Continental & United uniforms without adding anything unique or fun (not that I’m an airline fashion expert). From United’s PR release:

Tens of thousands of United Airlines employees worldwide – including flight attendants, customer service agents, technical operations and ramp workers – begin wearing newly designed uniforms today, the first time members of these work groups will wear similarly styled uniforms. More than 64,000 United employees will debut the garments, which feature accents of blue, gold, silver and gray.

“The new uniforms project a contemporary, sophisticated look that reflects the modern airline we’re building,” said Jeff Foland, United’s executive vice president – marketing, technology and strategy. “With significant feedback from our uniformed co-workers, we’ve designed pieces that are professional, stylish and functional.”

United pilots will begin wearing newly designed uniforms later this year in the traditional midnight blue color with gold stripes and accents. Other uniform design concepts include:

  • Flight Attendants: The uniform includes a core wardrobe of black trousers, skirts, sweaters, vests and blazers with two rows of silver braid on the sleeves. Female flight attendants will also wear sweaters, vests, short sleeve jackets and two styles of dresses, including a signature blue dress with a black stripe detail. Outerwear for male and female flight attendants includes a black all-season coat and an optional gray double-breasted wool coat.
  • Customer Service Agents: The uniform includes a wardrobe of black blazers, trousers, sweaters, vests and skirts. Agents will also wear colored shirts and distinctive neckwear that vary depending on their job responsibilities.
  • Ramp, Cargo and Technical Operations: The uniform offers flexibility, comfort and durability for year round comfort. Employees will wear work shirts, polo shirts and T-shirts made with breathable and flexible fabric. The pants, shorts and coveralls for both men and women feature a soft, brushed fabric. Outerwear for ramp, cargo and technical operations workers includes a three-piece system consisting of a zip-up fleece-lined vest, jacket and waterproof outer shell. The uniform also includes waterproof wind pants, hooded sweatshirts, baseball caps and knit caps.

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Comments

  1. As an Elite with United, I think the airline does a whole load of things remarkably (usually remarkably badly).

    But one of the most remarkable things about the airline is it has absolutely no sense of style or class.

  2. I have no idea what their concept is or what road they are trying to go with their uniforms/identity.

    They have several different FA uniforms, one looks out of 1980’s Star Trek, I look at these and have no idea who a United Employee is, it’s terrible.

    They lack an identity and leadership and it’s coming around for everyone to see.

    Every uniform is different with nothing really the same to let us know they work for United, it really is boring and terrible.

    Another failure for United.

  3. you would think that they had an opportunity to really create something nice – Flight attendants are the ambassadors of the airline to the public. No, it seems they went and got a d-list designer to create a walmart special for the FA’s. What were they thinking? The blue dress looks like it’s made from cheap poly blend and can come apart easily. I have spoken to both FA’s from pmUA and pmCO and both say they HATE their new uniforms. Another thing we are going to like???

  4. I feel bad for the employees. The employees should stand out, not blend IN. I think they should hire a new designer. 🙂

  5. It looks as though the designs were selected by employees who don’t want to look like they work for United. This makes sense if you’re an employee as you just want to walk around and not be bothered by passengers/customers and viewed just like another person at the airport.

    If that was the goal from UA, it was a resounding success. However, if UA was trying to make it apparent who is/not an UA employee, then I think only the nametag and blue dress are helpful.

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