Comparing AA, DL, UA’s Different Business Models on the Transcon Fleets

At one extreme, economy class makes up nearly 65% of Delta’s transcontinental seats. On the other hand, main cabin represents 35% of American’s seats. United falls in between, but in terms of the absolute number of premium seats, its configuration is comparable to American’s. The additional premium seating gives United and American a potential unit revenue advantage, but Delta’s denser configuration gives it a clear lead on unit costs. The three clearly differ in how they balance the dual priorities of squeezing as many passengers onto the plane as possible and offering extra-legroom seats for corporate customers.

Check out the very interesting article, “In Business Class, Delta Zigs, United and American Zag”, from Adam Levine-Weinberg at The Motley Fool here.

As noted in the linked posts below, Delta’s transcontinental 757s have 168 seats, 16 full flat-bed business class seats, 44 Economy Comfort Seats, and 108 Economy seats.United 757s have only 142 seats including 28 full-flat bed business class seats, 42 Economy Plus seats and 72 regular Economy seats. American’s new Airbus A321s have just 102 seats, 10 in first, 20 business class seats, 36 main cabin extra seats, and just 36 main cabin seats.

Comments

  1. You are not flying the same planes that I am on ! How many of DLs B757s actually have these seats? How many of the new AA A320s are flying? How many UA planes with new seats have you been on? I think this post is quite misleading. Now if you are talking about the future state of affairs, then ok, but this is not reflective of what is up in the air at the moment!

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