Former United / US Airways Attendant Shares Her Confessions

former United and US Airways flight attendant who retired in 2011 shares “secrets” of her time in the sky…like so many other attendants the last few years. Unfortunately, these are not United or US specific, that would have actually been juicy. Many of these are not all that surprising (or unique)…but here are a few snippets, check out her full list of 9 secrets over at the HuffPost:

If your flight attendant turns quiet, it’s to run through emergency scenarios.

Just before takeoff, flight attendants are often required to take 30 seconds to run through their safety training, reviewing what will happen should anything go wrong during the trip. “Your flight attendant may be chatting with you, but she’ll stop and be quiet or just look out the window, she’s thinking about what she would do in an emergency.”

Airplane food feeds more than just passengers.

After passengers have been served, the cabin crew will sometimes eat leftover first-class meals.

2013 Delta flight attendant job seekers faced tougher acceptance odds than Harvard applicants.

In 2013, Delta received about 44,000 applications for about 400 flight attendant job openings — that’s a lower acceptance rate than Harvard’s. This year’s Delta recruitment is looking just as tough — there will be about 200,000 applications for 1,800 open spots. “This is a dream for a lot of people,”.

If you really want to tip your flight attendant, try asking three times.

Passengers often assume flight attendants make a lot of money, but “it’s not a very good wage at all.” Many airlines discourage tipping, she explains, and advise that crew members turn down a passenger’s first attempt at offering a tip. Try a second or third time, though, and your flight attendant will feel freer to accept. “Or just put it in an envelope and leave it on your seat.”

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