Air Tahiti Nui Unveils New Brand Identity, Cabins for Dreamliners

Air Tahiti Nui New Logo

Celebrating 20 years in the sky, Air Tahiti Nui unveiled a new visual identity and new cabins for its Boeing 787-9 Dreamliners, set to be delivered in November.

Long synonymous with Air Tahiti Nui and Tahiti at large, the ubiquitous and glorious Tiare flower assumes pride of place in our logo, but with a sophisticated, modern new look.

New Cabins

The carrier will introduce three redesigned cabins in the following configurations:

▫  Poerava Business Class | 30 seats | 2-2-2 configuration

▫  Moana Premium Economy | 32 seats | 2-3-2 configuration

▫  Moana Economy | 232 seats | 3-3-3 configuration

I’m sure many will critique the carrier’s decision to install an off-the-shelf, decade-old business class seat, but I actually think it’s appropriately positioned for a market like Tahiti. While most new business class seats feature all-aisle access, Tahiti is the true definition of a leisure market; most passengers will be couples, companions, etc., and would value paired seats over privacy.

Photo: United Airlines | Dreamliner “Polaris” Business Class Seat

Hawaiian Airlines, currently the only US airline to serve Tahiti (once-weekly at that) also installed a 2-2-2 seat configuration on its A330 aircraft.

United will become the second US airline to serve Tahiti in October with three-weekly service from San Francisco. United will fly to Papeete on a Dreamliner (787-8 version) with the exact same seat. Coincidence? United’s Dreamliner cabins have a hospital-like blandness to them, but at least they didn’t install these stickers on the galleys, seen below. They look like advertisements Ryanair used to put on its overhead bins.

 

Photo: Air Tahiti Nui

 

Photo: Air Tahiti Nui

 

Photo: Air Tahiti Nui

Soothing or Underwhelming?

There’s nothing groundbreaking with this refresh, but it’s important to understand changes within the context of the market. Only a handful of airlines fly to Papeete, the main competition being Air France, Air New Zealand, French Bee, and United come October. Auckland is out of the way for European and North American travelers; French Bee only offers premium economy; and United has the same seat. Air France is the only serious competition since it serves Papeete with its reconfigured 777-200s.

❝ Air Tahiti Nui doesn’t offer an industry-leading product because it doesn’t have to. ❞

 

Photo: Air New Zealand

 

Thoughts on the new cabin?

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Comments

  1. I wouldn’t include Hawaiian among Air Tahiti Nui’s “main competition.” Hawaiian only flies once per week to PPT. Also Air Tahiti Nui doesn’t fly to Hawaii, and I doubt that Hawaiian is picking off much of TN’s business between the mainland US and Tahiti by connecting them over HNL. I’ve flown the HNL-PPT R/T a couple times (RIP Virgin America Elevate Miles…which were 25k R/T for this route!) and each time there has been an abundance of empty seats.

  2. Nice cabins! So who’s the best airline (as far as awards availability from U.S. mainland to Papeete/Bora Bora in business class)? After all, what good is to have nice cabins but no availability for awards redemption. Currently thinking about doing a Bora Bora trip in premium cabins for 3 ppl. Any airlines you can think of that has the best awards availability? Thanks!

    • Hi Tigris23, Thanks for reading. United is launching Papeete (PPT) this fall from San Francisco (SFO) – probably your best bet for award travel. Saver business awards do not appear to be available on united.com but I do see saver economy awards for 35,000 miles one-way. Air France also serves PPT from Los Angeles if you’re looking to redeem Amex, Delta, or Air France miles. Happy flying!

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