737s Set to Take over Trans-Atlantic Routes, Change Future of Flying

United has been flying 757s across the Atlantic for years, but what about 737s? Believe it or not, they are already in use. Scandinavian Airlines flies an 86-seat 737-700 on Boston – Copenhagen, limiting the number of passengers below 90 to increase range. Meanwhile, WestJet operates St. John’s, Newfoundland – Dublin (exactly 2K miles) and Halifax, Nova Scotia – Glasgow with 136 seat configured 737-700s.

Well, Bloomberg takes a look at the future of trans-Atlantic flying with the re-engined 737 Max and A320neo and it’s fascinating. The new engines will add 500 miles to their range and allow the jets to fly 3K miles. Norwegian Air Shuttle ASA, JetBlue, and TAP have all purchased the jets for US-Europe flying. Cities served, weekly frequencies, and major hub changes will all be consequences of the new 757 and A320.

“The Max is very competitive,” Norwegian Air Chief Executive Officer Bjorn Kjos said in an interview in London. “It has huge potential from the smaller cities along the Atlantic coast. But you can’t go into New York as you do with wide-bodies. You must target airports with a totally different cost structure.”

Check out details on what the future will hold in Bloomberg‘s article here.

737

Comments

  1. The range of the 737 still means airlines are stuck with eastern seaboard US-west coast European cities, with a customer base that absolutely refuses stopovers. The bigger disrupter will be the A321neoLR, which opens up not only northern and central Europe, but also the American mideast to low-cost airlines.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *